Eden’s On The Air: “Conducting Conversations” With Mike Maino of WCRI

Don’t touch that dial!

Eden with Mike Maino of "Conducting Conversations", WCRI

8. Eden with Mike Maino of “Conducting Conversations”, WCRI

Conducting Conversations has been a beloved radio show for years. Host Mike Maino has talked to Broadway stars, genius conductors, world-class instrumentalists and  . . . me. I’m the first voice teacher to be on Conducting Conversations! The program airs on WCRI 95.9 FM in the Rhode Island area on Sunday, October 12 from 7 to 8pm. It’s available on podcast afterwards at www.classical959.com.

UPDATE: CLICK TO LISTEN!

Mike was a genial, generous host. I brought a mixed bag of music to share and he enjoyed the variety — he asked if he could keep the CD I burned for the show, so he could listen to all the tracks again! I started with my own performance from last April, to prove my bona fides. We talked about how I accidentally discovered that I was a coloratura, and then we played some Beverly Sills and Natalie Dessay, who are far more bona fide than I.

When Mike and I talked about teaching voice lessons to children, I presented two contrasting versions of O Mio Babbino Caro, one by Maria Callas and one by Jackie Evancho. Many of my younger students imitate Jackie, who is imitating Charlotte Church, who was imitating Kiri Te Kanawa. No one imitates Callas. (Is such a thing possible?)

Mike and I talked about opera stars singing pop, and pop style in opera. As a voice teacher, I have to help singers figure out what is appropriate and healthy for them vocally and stylistically, and what’s better left unsung. I brought two examples for fun: Placido Domingo singing the Beatles and “Catch Our Act At The Met,” a great show tune by Comden and Green. Note that Comden and Green do not actually try to sing opera, and that’s why the song works. I almost brought Freddie Mercury and Montserrat Caballe . . .oh well, next time!

Thanks Mike, for a great hour of conversation and shop talk! I love helping singers find their real voices. Singers can stretch themselves to stylistic limits and imitate other singers as they try to find their own sound, but every singer sounds wonderful when they are true to themselves.

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I Knew They Were Terrible Singers!

Michael W. Smith can't sing without hurting someone

Michael W. Smith: Doesn’t it hurt?

Back in the 1980s I listened to pop music just as much as any other teen. My favorite singers included Olivia Newton-John, Linda Ronstadt, Al Jarreau and the Manhattan Transfer. I also developed a blacklist of songs and singers that just sounded wrong to me. Back then, I probably dismissed the offender with a casual, “Eew! I just hate that song!” and turned the dial. Now I can see that my teen ears were often just reacting to some very bad vocal technique. Here, a few of the few songs I couldn’t stand when they first came out, and the vocal reasons why. The awful videos are just a bonus!

Place In This World: Michael W. Smith was a very popular Christian artist in the 1980s and 1990s and this was a crossover hit for him. Listen to that raspiness, especially on the choruses. This sound is the vocal equivalent of a three-day beard — it could be totally on purpose, or just a lack of (vocal) hygiene. He pronounces place as “pleece” because if he sang “place” he’d never hit the pitch. Try and do it yourself. Once.

Madonna has Lived To Tell

Madonna has Lived To Tell

Live To Tell, Madonna: Her first hit, “Borderline,” featured a very bright, nasal voice and a light timbre — so light, I could sing it easily and often did, and I really liked her for that reason. That, and the neon heels with socks. In this song, the melody is about an octave lower and Madonna is singing with a very dark, covered, almost swallowed sound. She’s also trying to carry her chest voice higher and is straining to do so. At the slumber party we could all sing “Borderline” with a brush for a microphone, but no one wanted to sing “Live To Tell.” I heard her sing it live on a concert video few years back, and she has improved. Keep up the lessons, Madonna, you may get somewhere!

Keep On Loving You, REO Speedwagon: I’ve hated this song “fereverrr.” Every choir teacher on earth begs their singers to drop the final ‘r’s in words, because if you sing an ‘r,’ it sounds like nerdy and immature and sort of like .  . . . Kevin Cronin of REO Speedwagon.

Heaven Is A Place On Earth, Belinda Carlisle: Vibrato tighter than her jeans. (But very cool eyeliner.) A too-fast vibrato can be an indication of vocal tension, or inadequate breath support. Carlisle’s veers very close to tremolo, which sounds almost like a vocal tremble. At least it does to my ears. She sang that way when she fronted the Go-Gos too, but she sang in a higher range then. As a solo artist, she sang in lower keys and the fast vibrato was more noticeable to me.

Oh, there are more. And you have your own vocal transgressors to accuse. Tell me what you hate, and I’ll tell you . . why.

 

Warmups for Choirs

Let's make this go viral, but not Ebola viral

Let’s make this go viral, but not Ebola viral

My latest contribution to cyberspace: A video of warmups for the singers of The Chorus Of Westerly. Director Andrew Howell asked me to record some warmups that singers could do every day at home (I’m the vocal coach for the Chorus). I suggested that a picture is worth a thousand arpeggios.

We tried to include a cross-section of exercises to suit the needs of the majority of our singers, who range in age from 8 to 80. So we stretched, we yawned, we made whale sounds, we wailed sirens, and we did some breathing exercises. You can do ‘em too! Go ahead! Screen Shot 2014-09-23 at 11.00.07 AM

At the Chorus, I’ve been able to hear about 20 or 30 of the individual singers over the past couple of years. Some have come for voice lessons or for voice class, or I’ve just been sitting near them in rehearsal. But most of the voices are known to me only as part of a group. I still have to figure out how to help them sing better. One-on-one vocal instruction can lead to rapid results because you can zone in on individual quirks and abilities. How do you improve the vocal technique of multiple singers at the same time? A choir director can demonstrate and then ask for an “oo” vowel, but every singer will take that direction a little differently. One chorister will sing “oo” with little change in the vocal tract, while the one right next door might sing an “oo” that sounds like an “oh,” with some  “uh,” and “eeew” in there too. Each “oo” will be different because the person, like the voice, is unique, and the producer is too close to the sound to really hear what it sounds like. Each voice carries a lifetime of singing shoulds and shouldn’ts, unbroken bad habits, and (often) some overdone good habits. How do you get one person to brighten their “uh” to an “eeh” to wind up on “ooh” while the person right next to them needs to darken their nasal “eeew” with more “uh”? And then do that with, say, an additional 138 singers?

Yawn if you love the Chorus of Westerly

Yawn if you love the Chorus of Westerly

One of my solutions is asking everyone to make some extreme sounds, to increase flexibility and show a singer what’s vocally possible in their own throat. Everyone, make “ee” so bright it needs sunglasses. Spread your lips, grin like a Cheshire Cat, and say “ee.” Okay, that’s bright! Feel the position of your tongue when you make that “ee.” Now, make a dark, woofy “ugh” in the very back of the throat, like a monster on Halloween. Notice the difference. I mug, I grimace, I make very weird sounds and cheer every singer who’s brave enough to do it with me. Most find it very freeing and fun. You’re watching this on your computer? TRY IT! 

Every singer should safely explore the limits of their instrument, individually or in a group. We get used to singing vowels in certain ways, we get used to hearing ourselves sing the same way, and we begin to lose flexibility. Sirens and wails and extreme sounds can help any singer find new colors and new vocal possibilities. Singers might also rethink where their voice is, in relation to those extremes. And they might be a little more willing to make small changes or adjustments. 

Want me to come do whale sounds with your choir? Just ask!